Elvis and Gladys Mothers Day edition

Elvis was Gladys world.

Gladys was Elvis world.

Their relationship is legendary and yet they were two people with different life experiences. Different dreams. And yet their bond surpassed wealth, fame, and riches.

Elvis tried to jump into Gladys’ burial plot, on top of her casket, while crying uncontrollably saying “I’ve lost everything”. I’ll give it all up to be with you. I can’t go on without you Satin-in (his nickname for her since childhood). My God please bring her back.

When Elvis decided to record Momma liked the roses he was torn between, even these years after her passing, being incredibly sad and recording a remembrance song not only for him but for all others who lost their mothers. Though it was an emotional recording you can hear the love and respect he had and the words torn from his very soul.

Elvis sent flowers to her grave on a weekly basis. He visited her grave as much as possible and every time he knelt and cried. A heartbreaking cry. He confided, on one occasion as he rarely shared his loss, that what sustained him was his belief in God/Jesus and that there was an afterlife where he believed Gladys was. In a new body never to hurt again. Never to cry again. And always looking out for Elvis and being there with him.

Priscilla recalled that one time she went, without Elvis knowing, into the attic at Graceland and there were all of Gladys clothes neatly hung or folded. Her personal things. She could smell Gladys perfume. She saw how short in height she was. She went through her jewelry and fawned at the most expensive pieces knowing that she was embarrassed when she received them as she said “son you don’t need to spend so much on me” and “the best present you can give me is your time. that means more to me”. But Elvis had, since childhood, promised to provide for her. To buy her a house. To buy her a nice new car knowing she couldn’t drive and didn’t own a drivers license. To ensure she never again had to work backbreaking labor as she had most of her life.

In August of 1958, while Elvis was in the US Army, Gladys became very sick. Elvis immediately put in an emergency leave request. It was denied. He appealed in perform. He was denied. It was only after he threatened to go AWOL was his leave approved.

When Elvis made it to Gladys hospital room she perked up. Her color seemed to come back. Her voice was audible. Elvis never stopped holding her hand, kissing her, running his fingers through her hair, telling her how much he loved her, and refusing to leave her side.

There came a time after the doctor said it was fine and Vernon asked for the 50th time, that Elvis left the hospital room and went back to Graceland. Sadly, Gladys died before he could make it back to the hospital. To say he was devastated was an understatement.

Gladys died on August 14, 1958, at the age of 46 but Elvis was always told she was 4 years younger thus dying at age 42. Sadly, Elvis would die on the same month – the age he thought she was being 42 – and even the same week (i.e. August 16, 1977).

If you have your mother cherish her. Tell her you love her. Make amends with her. Spend time with her. As Elvis once said during an emotional exchange “if you don’t love your mother with all your heart it’s against God and human nature. Your mother should be the greatest love and you should let her know it every day. You should take care of her and provide for her. She gave you something you can never repay…life”.

Thoughts, prayers, and thanks always to the family of; Marty Lacker, Patti Perry, Todd Morgan, Red West, Sonny West, Lamar Fike, Joe Esposito, Scotty Moore, Bill Black, Mryna Smith

Published with expressed permission mr schrembs 2017 all rights reserved

1971 Elvis onstage white jumpr with circular slotted oneof the BEST shots

 

The holidays have started and three more approaching; Hanukkah, CHristmas, and New Years. I hope, and wish, everyone is healthy – happy – and enjoying the life you have this day.

I’m sad. Real sad. And not just because of the carousel of bad health news and missing my children 24/7. I’m sad for the families who have lost loved ones. Families who are dealing with heath issues. Families without transportation. Families without means. Families who are broken. But, because this is an Elvis Presley related blog (and thank you for visiting and we sincerely appreciate it) those mentioned herein.

Inasmuch an I am (personally) sorry, and sad, I have been thinking a lot about those who have passed that not just “shared” a life with Elvis but were integral in the life of Elvis. Those who were essential accounts, firsthand accounts, of his life. His moods. His faults. His dreams. His accomplishments. His shortcomings. His career. His loves. His losses. His giving. His temper. We look back now and see the accomplishments but we forget that Elvis was the best. He did not have the perspective as we do to look back with envy. He was working. He was experimenting. He was living his life. He had no idea how things would play out. He tried. And he tried again. He stayed true to himself. His love of his mother. His life in destitute poverty. His being laughed at and bullied for being different. What all seems like glitz and glitter now only came about because of the summary of all these actions. All these feelings. All these efforts. It looks easy now, because Elvis made everything look easy and it was real and graceful, but he endured hardships and the harshest of criticism and attacks. The Grand Ole Opry, who he grew up listening to and respected, telling him to “go back and drive a truck” while laughing at him as they turned him down to perform at the Opry. How about being called satan? How about being blamed for the rise in delinquency in youths and their violence? How about having derogatory names, and inferences, about his beloved mother? I could go on and on.

My thoughts are on the families, the loved ones, the friends, etc. of those whose loved ones have passed and are still mourned who were in Elvis’ life. In so specific order they are; Patti Perry, Lamar Fike, Red West, Sonny West, Scotty Moore, Bill Black, Myrna Smith, and Joe Esposito. Also, Todd Morgan my friend who started at Graceland when it opened and bridged the gap (and I will forever respectfully ask that Billy Smith be given a PERMANENT recognition by EPE/Priscilla/Lisa Marie and make every effort to allow him to share what he wants and never have to worry about money again) between the fans and the estate. To those who know me I don’t take “friendship” lightly and Todd and a few others named in this post were my friends. I miss them. I will always.

May God bless those families/loved ones/friends of those mentioned here and THANK YOU for all you have done and I’m forever sorry for your loss. They were individually and collectively unique and essential. Elvis fans are forever in their debt and count me among them.

Take care and may God bless you all.

 

Jeff Schrembs

 

Eternal prayers to the family of Marty Lacker from Jeff Schrembs

Image result for marty lacker 1971

  • Photo of Marty Lacker circa 1971 (the date may be off)

It is so…sad.

Marty Lacker passed away on February 13, 2017 at the age of 80 leaving behind a great family, loved ones, friends, etc. I am so very sorry for loss not just as I type these words but until my time comes to leave this earth.

His obituary, from Calane Funeral Directors, is as follows: Martin J. “Marty” Lacker peacefully passed Monday, February 13, 2017 of natural causes. He is preceded in death by his parents Henry and Rose Grodstein Lacker and his sister Anne Louise Lacker Grenadier. He is survived by two daughters Angie and Sheri Lacker of Memphis and one son Marc Lacker (daughter in law, Brenda Stoyka Lacker), Best friend, Patsy Daniels, Grandchildren are Brandon Lacker (Whitney), Cody Lacker and Katelynn Lacker and three Great Grandchildren Kydon, Kinzyn and Keston Lacker, and Special friends Billy and Jo Smith and Julie Bramlett. Born in the Bronx and raised in Brooklyn, NY on January 3, 1937 moved to Memphis in 1952, and attended Humes High School. After a semester at the UT Knoxville he was the successful radio Program Director at WKGN Knoxville. Later his radio career took him to WNOE New Orleans and subsequently back to Memphis’ WHBQ.

Discharged from the Army in late ’56 in Germany, he was invited to visit with fellow Humes alumnus Elvis Presley and became a close friend. In 1961, Elvis asked Marty to work for him and he eventually became Elvis’ right hand man and co-Best Man at Presley’s wedding. Marty appeared in 13 of Elvis’ movies, joined music tours, and co-ordinated recording sessions that produced iconic Presley hits. In 1969, he was responsible for Elvis returning to Memphis to record for the first time in 14 years. He convinced Elvis to record with producer Chips Moman at American Studios in what many have declared his greatest hit records since the Sun years like “Suspicious Minds” and “In the Ghetto”. Lacker remained a close and trusted friend until Elvis passed away. He was also responsible for the City Council and Memphis Mayor changing the name of Highway 51 S. to Elvis Presley Blvd in late 1971.

Outside the Elvis connection, Marty became a pillar in the Memphis Music industry in the late 60’s and 70’s, first with accepting an offer to start Pepper Tanner Records discovering Rita Coolidge and producing projects for her and then Eddie Harrison & The Shortkuts along with the help of his friends Isaac Hayes and David Porter. After becoming the General Manager of American Studios, he was responsible for other artists such as Petula Clark, Dionne Warwick, Jackie DeShanon and Bill Medley of The Righteous Brothers fame to record at the studio. He was later affiliated with Stax Recording Studios.

Marty Lacker was responsible for creating the Memphis Music Awards Show in the early 70’s and subsequently created an environment that drew many major record company leaders to Memphis. Marty, being one of the leaders of the Memphis Music industry of that era was the person who conceived the original Memphis & Shelby County Music Commission and was voted in and served as its chairman and was one of the co-founders of the Memphis Chapter of the National Association of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS), which is the Grammys.

Marty co-authored two popular books on Elvis and has appeared on numerous documentaries about Elvis and aspects of Memphis Music. In 2010, he was honored with a Beale Street Blues Note for his music industry accomplishments.

Services will be 12:30 p.m. Thursday, February 16, 2017 at Baron Hirsch Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers please donate to your favorite children’s charity or animal rescue program

To send flowers or a memorial gift to the family of Martin “Marty” J. Lacker please visit our Sympathy Store.

I was very fortunate to have had a relationship, of mutual respect,  with Marty over a great period of time. He was one of a kind and brutally honest. His passing has hit me like a Louisville Slugger to the back of the head. However, whatever grief I have is nothing compared to what his family/loved ones must be going through. My thoughts and prayers remain with them.

I also want to say THANK YOU to so many exceptional Elvis Presley related websites who conducted intimate, and fact filled, interviews with Marty over the years. I know firsthand the sacrifices and now your endeavor(s) carry greater weight that Elvis Presley fans will seek out – appreciate – support – etc. as long as there remains an interest in Elvis.

* Note some of these websites are (including but not limited to); http://www.ElvisPresleyNews.com, http://www.ElvisInfoNet.com, http://www.ElvisBlog.net, http://www.Elvis-Express.com, http://www.Elvis.com, etc.

To each of these websites, and the dedicated people associated, please keep up the good work(s) and I wish you (personally and professionally) continued success in every endeavor you undertake. Take care and may God bless you and yours…always.

I’ll miss him.

Man, I’ll…

 

Jeff Schrembs