The Elvis Presley Expert: Heartaches in the life of Elvis Presley (by Jeff S…

The Elvis Presley Expert: Heartaches in the life of Elvis Presley (by Jeff S…: Far too many people, articles, DVDs, online posts, and TV commentary put an emphasis on (a) how Elvis died and/or (b) factually incorrec…

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The Elvis Presley Expert: Heartaches in the life of Elvis Presley (by Jeff S…

The Elvis Presley Expert: Heartaches in the life of Elvis Presley (by Jeff S…: Far too many people, articles, DVDs, online posts, and TV commentary put an emphasis on (a) how Elvis died and/or (b) factually incorrec…

The Elvis Presley Expert: Heartaches in the life of Elvis Presley (by Jeff S…

The Elvis Presley Expert: Heartaches in the life of Elvis Presley (by Jeff S…: Far too many people, articles, DVDs, online posts, and TV commentary put an emphasis on (a) how Elvis died and/or (b) factually incorrec…

Heartaches in the life of Elvis Presley (by Jeff Schrembs)

Far too many people, articles, DVDs, online posts, and TV commentary put an emphasis on (a) how Elvis died and/or (b) factually incorrect assumptions about how he lived the last few years of his life.

 

Though Elvis gained wealth beyond imagination, worldwide fame, success in every aspect of the entertainment fields (i.e. singing, TV appearances, life performances, movies, etc.), and a legacy that will endure having been burned into the pages of history what is commonly overlooked it the great amount of sadness and heartache he endured from the moment of his birth through the last days of his life and in-between.

 

I could write a lengthy book about this topic but here are some notable facts:

 

1.    Elvis was born after his twin brother, who was born first, died at birth (i.e. stillborn). Having heard about this, and seeing how much it pained his mother and father, throughout his childhood it made a lasting impression on Elvis and saddened him greatly.

 

2.    Elvis Mother, Gladys Love (Smith) Presley, was pregnant with a child AFTER Elvis was born but (sadly) miscarried. She was told she could never have a child again so Elvis would be her only living child.

 

3.    Elvis’ Father, Vernon Elvis Presley, spent time in jail (note: he made FULL restitution, did his time, learned from this, and never was in any type of trouble with authorities again) and Elvis recalled how this devastated his mother.

 

4.    Elvis had many ailments as a child including, but not limited to, the following: asthma, chronic insomnia, sleep apnea, sleep walking (and numerous times he just missed being killed by passing cars as he slept walked), acne, and heart palpitations.

 

5.    Elvis was born into, and grew up, extremely poor monetarily. He knew what it was like to go without food, heat, shelter, food, and seeing his parents do everything they could to provide for him and yet they always lived “day to day”.

 

6.    Elvis grew up knowing he was “different” and this affected his social interaction with other children. Fortunately, around the age of 11 his confidence in himself – his appearance – and his abilities increased.

 

7.    Elvis grew up listening to the Grand Ole Opry and he was thankful to have the opportunity to audition for the Grand Ole Opry but he was REJECTED. Elvis never forgot this rejected but he used this as fuel to perform, and record, and he “proved them wrong”.

 

8.    During the height of his fame, and popularity, he was drafted into the US Army (i.e. December of 1957). As he had only been out of the United States once, to go to Canada, he was overwhelmed with the reality of living in another Country. However, Elvis turned down all offers to enter into the “celebrity entertainment” branch of the service (i.e. where he would go to bases/events and sing for his fellow enlisted men) and was honorably discharged from the US Army.

 

9.    Elvis going into the Army had an adverse effect on his mother. She became very sick and was hospitalized in August of 1958. When Elvis was told about this he immediately asked for an emergency medical leave of absence and it was denied. He had to threaten to go AWOL, and to the press, before he was finally granted leave.

 

10.   Upon arriving at the hospital, where his mother was at, her spirits improved. Elvis was exhausted and was told to go to Graceland to rest. Shortly after arriving at Graceland his mother’s condition worsened and she (sadly) died on August 14, 1958 at the age (Elvis believed throughout his life) of 42. However, his mother actually died at the age of 46.

11.  During his 2 year term in the US Army he worried about his career and had real doubts about his “comeback”.

 

12.  From 1960 until 1969 Elvis was contractually obligated to make motion pictures/movies. With each passing year, with a few exceptions, the quality of the movie scripts lessened to such an extent that it made Elvis physically sick and bothered him mentally and emotionally.

 

13.  Elvis was offered, by Barbara Streisand, the costarring role in the remake of “A Star Is Born”. Elvis was excited to act in a real movie with a great script/cast. Colonel Parker was unable to reach an agreement and Elvis was devastated.

 

14.  A song entitled “I Will Always Love You” was brought to Elvis and he loved the song and wanted to record it. This song was written by Dolly Parton and later made infamous by Whitney Houston. Similarly to what happened in “A Star Is Born” Colonel Parker was unable to reach an agreement. Elvis had felt, starting in 1972, that the lack of quality songs he was being presented – and thus able to record – bothered him immensely.

 

15.   When Elvis’ wife, Priscilla, told Elvis that she was moving out of Graceland and wanted a divorce he was overwhelmed with emotions. He, at first begged her to reconsider, and then when he found out she was “seeing” another man (i.e. Mike Stone who Elvis had paid to be her Karate instructor) he was…furious. The hurt that Elvis endured, knowing that his marriage had failed and this his beloved daughter Lisa Marie would grow up without both of her parents being in love/happy/together/married/etc. (literally) broke his heart and adversely affected him every day thereafter.

 

16.   Starting from (about) 1975-1977 Elvis’ finances dwindled when compared to his actual worth and the amounts earned off his recordings, appearances, likeness, etc. Two of Elvis’ oldest friends, who had worked with him for three decades, wrote a book entitled “Elvis What Happened” which disclosed the fact that Elvis had been taking prescription drugs and was addicted to them and in some cases was abusing them. Even though Elvis had very real physical, mental, and emotional medical issues – which took their toll on him in every way (including his moods and weight) – Elvis was angry about this book and feared how it would affect his daughter Lisa Marie (first and foremost) and (secondly) his fans. Note: Elvis loved two of the men who wrote this book and they loved him. It is, was, and forever will be regrettable that they were not able, during Elvis’ lifetime, to work things out and make amends.

 

17.   Being in terrible shape physically, mentally, and emotionally Elvis kept his word and allowed the filming (in 1977) of his life performance. Elvis, who should have been allowed to rest – recover – obtain necessary medical care – obtain addiction therapy – and not be subjected to the monetary/financial pressure of having to perform. Knowing that the fans had heard of the book, and the press was increasingly making fun of his weight, Elvis nonetheless took the stage and showcased his incredibly voice. LISTENING to these songs, even these 35 years later, that Elvis sang on what is known as “Elvis CBS Special 1977” is a estimate to his vocal range and power. However, when WATCHING the video it is hard to keep looking at as Elvis was (sadly) in such bad shape. But, he gave his all to his fans knowing he would be mocked, and criticized, and for that (and all the other great accomplishments he achieved) Elvis should be respected, appreciated, and his life put into context.

 

I hope you enjoyed this article.

 

Take care and may God bless you.

 

Jeff Schrembs

 

Elvis Presley returns to making movies after stint in US Army

The tall young man with the dark, curly hair, smoothed down his soldier’s uniform, rose from the bar stool and walked glumly below bright lights, out among the crowded night-club tables. Sulkily he acknowledged applause and cheers of his soldier buddies, slapping one on the back, tousling another’s hair, as he moved toward the bandstand by popular request. When he neared the orchestra leader, he said to an approaching soldier:

 

“I thought I told you not to help.” The soldier grinned and replied, “What did I do?” Whereupon the dark-haired soldier mocked, with heavy sarcasm, “What did I do,” and sullenly accepted a guitar from a smiling bandleader.

 

 

There was no need for Elvis Presley to do any more than hold the guitar in this scene from “G. I. Blues,” his first movie since his discharge from the Army. He had already recorded in a sound studio his eleven songs for this picture. “I liked that,” Presley called across the night-club set at Paramount Studios as soon as the cameras stopped.” “I liked it too,” echoed Norman Taurog, the director, from beside the camera men. “We’ll print that.”

 

Mr. Taurog, who has a reputation for knowing how to work with child actors and young actors, explained that the secret of working with someone like Presley was that “you have to like music and you have to enjoy working with young people.”

 

Presley, he said, was obviously a natural for the movies. “There is no stiffness with this boy. This is the most relaxed boy you could want. He reminds me of Crosby and Como. He is a good listener. When you have a good listener you have a good actor.”

 

Hal B. Wallis, the producer, approached as Mr. Taurog broke off the eulogy to confer with him. Presley returned to his bar stool to chat with his co-star, Julie Prowse, who was adorned in flesh- colored tights and beads for her role of the night-club singer besought by Presley.

 

 

Mr. Wallis finished his conversation with Mr. Taurog and recalled how he had signed Presley under a personal movie contract more than four years ago. “I saw him on a TV show. There was an excitement in him. His whole look had it. I could see he was not just a singer. I saw something in him more than a personality. I signed him without a screen test.”

 

During an interval while the camera recorded crowd enthusiasm, in general and in detail, Mr. Presley withdrew to a small dressing room and discussed acting and singing. Acting, he said, was more difficult. He had heard that lots of young men and women venturing into movie work had decided to study acting. “I’m not doing any studying,” he said. “At least not so far as reading or taking lessons goes. I’m learning from experience.”

 

He denied he would sacrifice his singing career for acting. He liked singing too much, he explained. All kinds of singing. “The other night at the Milton Berle show–you know his night- club show–he put on six opera singers,” said Presley. “I flipped my lid. They had great voices, great arrangements.” With regret, he confessed that while he was stationed in Germany with the Army, he had not been to any opera. “I was just too tired at night to go anywhere,” he said sadly.

 

About his own singing, he was more specific. He does not read music, he said. “I just listen to it get played a few times. No one can tell me how you should do this song or that one. I work strictly my own way. If the day ever comes when I listen to anyone else I’ll get mechanical and I’m dead.”

 

He could see no sense in reports that rock ‘n’ roll music was dying and he said it was ridiculous to think that the success of this sort of music was due solely to payola to disk jockeys who plugged rock ‘n’ roll records.

 

“Rock ‘n’ roll music,” he said, “is getting better than ever. The sound engineers are learning more about how to handle the stuff. It couldn’t have been made popular by payola alone. Too many Americans love it. Nope. I don’t see why I should change my singing style right now. Seems pretty foolish to me. Of course,” he added, after a pause during which he squinted carefully up at the ceiling, “if things change I’ll change too. You have to. That’s show business.” Of the eleven songs he has done for “G. I. Blues,” he said that only about three or four were rock ‘n’ roll. “Then I did some medium beat and some ballads.”

 

He stretched. It was good, he said to have a car of his own instead of an Army jeep. “I get up just as early as I used to because I have to make movies.”

 

He grinned broadly. “There’s a little difference now. A little difference in tactics. A little difference in maneuvers.

 

Elvis Presley returns to movies after discharge from Army

The tall young man with the dark, curly hair, smoothed down his soldier’s uniform, rose from the bar stool and walked glumly below bright lights, out among the crowded night-club tables. Sulkily he acknowledged applause and cheers of his soldier buddies, slapping one on the back, tousling another’s hair, as he moved toward the bandstand by popular request. When he neared the orchestra leader, he said to an approaching soldier:

 

“I thought I told you not to help.” The soldier grinned and replied, “What did I do?” Whereupon the dark-haired soldier mocked, with heavy sarcasm, “What did I do,” and sullenly accepted a guitar from a smiling bandleader.

 

 

There was no need for Elvis Presley to do any more than hold the guitar in this scene from “G. I. Blues,” his first movie since his discharge from the Army. He had already recorded in a sound studio his eleven songs for this picture. “I liked that,” Presley called across the night-club set at Paramount Studios as soon as the cameras stopped.” “I liked it too,” echoed Norman Taurog, the director, from beside the camera men. “We’ll print that.”

 

Mr. Taurog, who has a reputation for knowing how to work with child actors and young actors, explained that the secret of working with someone like Presley was that “you have to like music and you have to enjoy working with young people.”

 

Presley, he said, was obviously a natural for the movies. “There is no stiffness with this boy. This is the most relaxed boy you could want. He reminds me of Crosby and Como. He is a good listener. When you have a good listener you have a good actor.”

 

Hal B. Wallis, the producer, approached as Mr. Taurog broke off the eulogy to confer with him. Presley returned to his bar stool to chat with his co-star, Julie Prowse, who was adorned in flesh- colored tights and beads for her role of the night-club singer besought by Presley.

 

 

Mr. Wallis finished his conversation with Mr. Taurog and recalled how he had signed Presley under a personal movie contract more than four years ago. “I saw him on a TV show. There was an excitement in him. His whole look had it. I could see he was not just a singer. I saw something in him more than a personality. I signed him without a screen test.”

 

During an interval while the camera recorded crowd enthusiasm, in general and in detail, Mr. Presley withdrew to a small dressing room and discussed acting and singing. Acting, he said, was more difficult. He had heard that lots of young men and women venturing into movie work had decided to study acting. “I’m not doing any studying,” he said. “At least not so far as reading or taking lessons goes. I’m learning from experience.”

 

He denied he would sacrifice his singing career for acting. He liked singing too much, he explained. All kinds of singing. “The other night at the Milton Berle show–you know his night- club show–he put on six opera singers,” said Presley. “I flipped my lid. They had great voices, great arrangements.” With regret, he confessed that while he was stationed in Germany with the Army, he had not been to any opera. “I was just too tired at night to go anywhere,” he said sadly.

 

About his own singing, he was more specific. He does not read music, he said. “I just listen to it get played a few times. No one can tell me how you should do this song or that one. I work strictly my own way. If the day ever comes when I listen to anyone else I’ll get mechanical and I’m dead.”

 

He could see no sense in reports that rock ‘n’ roll music was dying and he said it was ridiculous to think that the success of this sort of music was due solely to payola to disk jockeys who plugged rock ‘n’ roll records.

 

“Rock ‘n’ roll music,” he said, “is getting better than ever. The sound engineers are learning more about how to handle the stuff. It couldn’t have been made popular by payola alone. Too many Americans love it. Nope. I don’t see why I should change my singing style right now. Seems pretty foolish to me. Of course,” he added, after a pause during which he squinted carefully up at the ceiling, “if things change I’ll change too. You have to. That’s show business.” Of the eleven songs he has done for “G. I. Blues,” he said that only about three or four were rock ‘n’ roll. “Then I did some medium beat and some ballads.”

 

He stretched. It was good, he said to have a car of his own instead of an Army jeep. “I get up just as early as I used to because I have to make movies.”

 

He grinned broadly. “There’s a little difference now. A little difference in tactics. A little difference in maneuvers.

 

Elvis Presley returns to movies after Army discharge

The tall young man with the dark, curly hair, smoothed down his soldier’s uniform, rose from the bar stool and walked glumly below bright lights, out among the crowded night-club tables. Sulkily he acknowledged applause and cheers of his soldier buddies, slapping one on the back, tousling another’s hair, as he moved toward the bandstand by popular request. When he neared the orchestra leader, he said to an approaching soldier:

 

“I thought I told you not to help.” The soldier grinned and replied, “What did I do?” Whereupon the dark-haired soldier mocked, with heavy sarcasm, “What did I do,” and sullenly accepted a guitar from a smiling bandleader.

 

 

There was no need for Elvis Presley to do any more than hold the guitar in this scene from “G. I. Blues,” his first movie since his discharge from the Army. He had already recorded in a sound studio his eleven songs for this picture. “I liked that,” Presley called across the night-club set at Paramount Studios as soon as the cameras stopped.” “I liked it too,” echoed Norman Taurog, the director, from beside the camera men. “We’ll print that.”

 

Mr. Taurog, who has a reputation for knowing how to work with child actors and young actors, explained that the secret of working with someone like Presley was that “you have to like music and you have to enjoy working with young people.”

 

Presley, he said, was obviously a natural for the movies. “There is no stiffness with this boy. This is the most relaxed boy you could want. He reminds me of Crosby and Como. He is a good listener. When you have a good listener you have a good actor.”

 

Hal B. Wallis, the producer, approached as Mr. Taurog broke off the eulogy to confer with him. Presley returned to his bar stool to chat with his co-star, Julie Prowse, who was adorned in flesh- colored tights and beads for her role of the night-club singer besought by Presley.

 

 

Mr. Wallis finished his conversation with Mr. Taurog and recalled how he had signed Presley under a personal movie contract more than four years ago. “I saw him on a TV show. There was an excitement in him. His whole look had it. I could see he was not just a singer. I saw something in him more than a personality. I signed him without a screen test.”

 

During an interval while the camera recorded crowd enthusiasm, in general and in detail, Mr. Presley withdrew to a small dressing room and discussed acting and singing. Acting, he said, was more difficult. He had heard that lots of young men and women venturing into movie work had decided to study acting. “I’m not doing any studying,” he said. “At least not so far as reading or taking lessons goes. I’m learning from experience.”

 

He denied he would sacrifice his singing career for acting. He liked singing too much, he explained. All kinds of singing. “The other night at the Milton Berle show–you know his night- club show–he put on six opera singers,” said Presley. “I flipped my lid. They had great voices, great arrangements.” With regret, he confessed that while he was stationed in Germany with the Army, he had not been to any opera. “I was just too tired at night to go anywhere,” he said sadly.

 

About his own singing, he was more specific. He does not read music, he said. “I just listen to it get played a few times. No one can tell me how you should do this song or that one. I work strictly my own way. If the day ever comes when I listen to anyone else I’ll get mechanical and I’m dead.”

 

He could see no sense in reports that rock ‘n’ roll music was dying and he said it was ridiculous to think that the success of this sort of music was due solely to payola to disk jockeys who plugged rock ‘n’ roll records.

 

“Rock ‘n’ roll music,” he said, “is getting better than ever. The sound engineers are learning more about how to handle the stuff. It couldn’t have been made popular by payola alone. Too many Americans love it. Nope. I don’t see why I should change my singing style right now. Seems pretty foolish to me. Of course,” he added, after a pause during which he squinted carefully up at the ceiling, “if things change I’ll change too. You have to. That’s show business.” Of the eleven songs he has done for “G. I. Blues,” he said that only about three or four were rock ‘n’ roll. “Then I did some medium beat and some ballads.”

 

He stretched. It was good, he said to have a car of his own instead of an Army jeep. “I get up just as early as I used to because I have to make movies.”

 

He grinned broadly. “There’s a little difference now. A little difference in tactics. A little difference in maneuvers.

Elvis returns to movies after Army Discharge

Elvis returns to movies after Army Discharge.

via Elvis returns to movies after Army Discharge.

Schrembs Family Pets

Schrembs Family Pets